Useful IELTS Interview Expressions:
Lesson 10

In this lesson we will look at some useful IELTS interview expressions.

You need to make sure that you have adequate vocabulary and phrases to explain your position in the speaking test.

You may need to ask for clarification if you don't understand something, or for something to be repeated if it was said too fast for you.

It is also good if you have a variety of phrases to give your opinion. It is common in part three of the IELTS test, for example, to be given an opinion or view and to say what you think about it.

So you will need to say if you agree or disagree, or partially agree. Or maybe you think it depends on the circumstances.

Or you may need to give yourself some thinking time before you can answer a question.

Knowing and practicing some useful phrases will help you in this respect.

Below are a list of phrases to help improve your IELTS speaking and under the table is some further explanation for some of the phrases.

Most of these phrases and the examples below are more relevant to part 3 of the speaking test because this is where you are asked your opinion more than part 1, and you are more likely to misunderstand a question or need further clarification because the questions are more difficult.

 

USEFUL IELTS INTERVIEW EXPRESSIONS
Saying something in another way

What I'm trying to say is...

In other words...

To put it another way...

What I mean is...

Perhaps I should make that clearer by saying...

Agreeing with an opinion

Yes, I agree...

That's my view exactly.

I would tend to agree with that.

I couldn't agree more.

Disagreeing with an opinion

No, I disagree.

I'm afraid I disagree.

I see things rather differently myself.

I wouldn't say that is necessarily true.

I tend to disagree.

I'm not so sure about that.

Partially agreeing with an opinion

I don't entirely agree. It is true that......however...

That is partly true, but...

I agree with that to an extent. However...

Getting asked an opinion (by the examiner)

What do you think?

What's your view / opinion?

What are your views on...?

How do you feel about...?

Saying your opinion could vary according to the situation

That depends...

I think it really depends...

That depends on how you look at it.

Asking for clarification (part 3 only)

Could you please explain what ...(word)... means?

Sorry, I don't understand the question. Could you explain?

Sorry, I'm afraid I didn't understand the question.

Sorry, can I just clarify what you mean. Are you asking me ...(say what you believe you have been asked)...

Asking for repetition

Sorry, would you mind repeating the question?

Sorry, I didn't quite catch that. Could you repeat the question?

Summing up

So all in all...

To sum up...

To conclude...



When do I use these phrases?

1) Saying something in another way

People use these phrases to further clarify what they have said. In other words, to make it clear exactly what they mean.

So you are saying the same thing you have just said but in a different way. Maybe you felt you did not explain something properly to the examiner and it is better to say it again but differently or you just want to emphasize your point, as in this example:

Examiner: Some people think that children should not be allowed to watch anything they like on television because some programmes can negatively affect their behaviour. What do you think?

Candidate: I tend to disagree. I think children should be given the freedom to decide what is right for them to watch and not be told by parents what they can and cannot see. In other words, it's up to the child, not the parent. 


2) Getting asked an opinion / agreeing with an opinion / disagreeing with an opinion

You may use these phrases if the examiner asks you for your opinion on a topic. For example:

Examiner: Some people think that children should not be allowed to watch anything they like on television because some programmes can negatively affect their behaviour. What do you think?

Candidate: I wouldn't say that is necessarily true. Most children are mature enough to understand that television is not real and so I don't believe that it causes them any harm. I think children should be given the freedom to decide what is right for them to watch and not be told by parents what they can and cannot see.


3) Partially agreeing with an opinion

You may not fully agree with the opinion and wish to explain this further.

Examiner: Some people think that children should not be allowed to watch anything they like on television because some programmes can negatively affect their behaviour. What do you think?

Candidate: I don't entirely agree. It is true that some programs cause harm to children. For example, programs with very violent behaviour, so parents must ensure children don't watch these kinds of programs too much. However, there has to be a balance. Children have to be given some responsibility to make their own decisions to and it is simply not possible for the parents to monitor their children's TV habits all the time.


4) Saying your opinion could vary according to the situation

It is very often the case that an opinion is never that simple or straightforward that you can just 'agree' or 'disagree'.

It usually depends on the context, particular situation or person. It is common to say 'depends' when this is the case.

Examiner: Some people think that children should not be allowed to watch anything they like on television because some programmes can negatively affect their behaviour. What do you think?

Candidate: I think it really depends on the way the child has been brought up. Some children are brought up well by their parents and they know what is right and wrong and I don't think watching some programmes that have violence or similar things will change that. Other children aren't given the care or attention they need by their parents and they may have personal problems. Watching violence on TV may make them even worse if they already have a bad behaviour, so they probably do need to be monitored.


Answering part 3 questions using 'depends' is quite effective as it shows you can analyse a situation well rather than simply agreeing or disagreeing, and it also gives you a chance to say more than if you just agree or disagree.



 

› Useful Interview Expressions

 

 

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Other Speaking Lessons

Lesson 1:
IELTS Speaking Part 2 - Extending Your Answer

Lesson 2:
IELTS Speaking Part 1 - Improving your Responses

Lesson 3:
IELTS Speaking Part 3 - Describing Changes

Lesson 4:
IELTS Speaking Part 3 - Talking about the Future

Lesson 5:
IELTS Speaking Part 2 - Mind Map: Structuring your talk

Lesson 6:
IELTS Parts 1-3 - Formality & Getting the tone right

Lesson 7:
IELTS Speaking Part 2 - A hypothetical situation

Lesson 8:
IELTS Speaking Part 3 - Giving & Justifying Opinions

Lesson 9:
IELTS Speaking Part 1 - Types of Speaking Questions for IELTS

Lesson 10:
IELTS Speaking - Useful IELTS Interview Expressions

Lesson 11:
IELTS Speaking Part 3 - Using Personal Experiences


 




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