Starting the IELTS Writing Task 1

by Joy
(Nigeria )

Can I start my writing task 1 first sentence with, For example

The data below depicts information about .....

The given chart illustrates.......

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Jan 13, 2019
Starting the Writing Task 1
by: IELTS buddy

Yes though I would say this:

The chart depicts information about .....

"Data" is the "information" so you are repeating the same thing and the chart will not be "below" when the examiner sees it.

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A Tip for the First Sentence of your Task 1 Graph

by Joko
(Yangon, Myanmar)

I'm an English teacher and here's a Task 1 tip that a colleague shared with me. It's so simple and easy that I'm surprised I don't see it more. I teach it to all my students.

Seemingly every Task 1 essay I read online starts with a variation of this simple structure:

"The graph shows the changes in this or that..."

Okay. Fine. There's nothing wrong with that.

Try this:

"There is a graph which shows the changes in blah blah..."

See the change?

Now the first part of the sentence is an independent clause and it's combined with another independent clause with a relative pronoun. Point being, you've made a complex sentence right off the bat.

It doesn't matter that it's not the fanciest of complex sentence, you've still ticked off one of the grammar criteria in just a few words.

Better yet, you're on your way toward what band 7 asks for: a variety of complex sentences. Might as well get started right away.

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Dec 11, 2018
A Tip for the First Sentence of your Task 1 Graph
by: IELTS buddy

The problem is you can't say that sentence...

It's grammatically correct but we don't use that kind of structure ("There is a graph...") in that context.

It suggests that the person is talking about some other graph, not the one on the page that is being looked at.

So really you need to stick with the classic IELTS academic task 1 openings.

To give some examples:

- The graph shows / illustrates / depicts / presents / compares

('graph' can be substituted for 'bar', 'map' etc depending on the diagram given and words such as 'compare' can only be used if a comparison is bring made of course)

Dec 11, 2018
Defining relative clause
by: Anonymous

My dear IELTS Buddy,

Of course you can say that sentence. We don't use that kind of structure in that context? As an NES, I'm one of the "we" and frankly, I'm hard pressed to find a context to base your statement on.

Srsly, when, in life, are we asked to summarize the information of a graphic? There is no context. I spent 8 years in tertiary academia and never once had to write something like a task 1 writing assignment. The only context is the norms of the Task 1 writing test itself.

It suggests that the person is talking about some other graph -

That's why they call it a defining relative clause.

There is a graph which shows / illustrates / depicts / presents / compares

No difference between the "classic" opening and this technique other than 4 words and the writer having ticked off the complex sentence box, building towards a variety of complex sentences.

Dec 11, 2018
Task one
by: Anonymous

Can I say (the graph which is given here illustrates....)

Dec 11, 2018
Passive voice
by: Joko

"The graph which is given here..."

Grammaticaly, that phrase is fine, and it's passive voice, which is another grammar feature they're looking for.

If you're writing about about a process or a map with changes over time, you'll probably be writing most of your sentences in passive voice. So, you'll be able to demonstrate that part of your "range of grammar" elsewhere.

Dec 12, 2018
Using there is
by: IELTS buddy

Hi Joko,

Sorry but it does not fit to use that phrase: "There is a graph..."

There are plenty of contextual examples - graphs are used in reports all the time with descriptions of the data and in research papers where data has been collected and discussed.

Do an online search and you'll find plenty of examples that are not IELTS related. And I can assure you you will not see that phrase used with it as it does not work.

I can't go into the grammatical usage of 'there is' here but if you search online you can see the way in which it is normally used.

Of course it is up to you how you advise your students and if people reading this decide to use it, but personally I would strongly advise against it as it is the first thing an examiner will see and you want to make a good first impression.

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